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How often does an adult dog need to pee?

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  • How often does an adult dog need to pee?

    My wife & I are fighting over how often the dog (2yo Brittney) needs to go out. She insists he go out right at bedtime but if I do this then I have a hard time getting to sleep after. So I walk him about 9pm and she does it in the morning about 8am. Is this too long? He has not had any accidents in the house. Typically he doesn't bother to get up & come downstairs when I get up to go to work so it seems he's not urgent to go relieve himself.

    Please help save my marriage!

  • #2
    So your marriage depends on a dogs peeing schedule.....

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    • #3
      So you're expecting your dog to 'hold it' for 11 hours. Ask yourself and your wife if you'd be comfortable holding it that long. And then remind yourself that your dog's bladder is smaller than yours.

      Just because a dog can hold it that long, does not mean it's comfortable or healthy. Just like with people, holding pee too long can cause UTIs and kidney problems. And it is possible that an overfull bladder can rupture, especially if the dog jumps around or has any kind of impact to the abdomen. Then you're in trouble.
      emily

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      Disclaimer: Any similarities in my posts to anyone or anything real is purely coincidental.
      Please do not take anything I type as fact. I also may not be who I say I am, so don't know anything about anything.

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      • #4
        In my experience the periods vary, just like us. They can hold it if they need to and if you take a dog for a walk they will pee 20 times.

        You'll know when they are desperate, their body language will be either saying I need "to go" or "I need to eat". Very smart little cookies are dogs.
        Dog Breeds | Pet Directory

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        • #5
          Sounds fine to me. I wouldn't worry about it too much. If he drinks a lot of water one night, I'm sure he'll tell you if he needs to go out sooner.
          Krystal

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          • #6
            So, if she thinks he needs to go out before bedtime, why can't she take the dog out?

            I personally make sure my dog gets outside before bed, its not her fault she has no thumbs and can't function a door handle. she goes out first thing in the morning (without a leash, finally, I'm so excited!) I stand there while she scurries around the yard pooping and peeing and then we go in and she has breakfast, throughout the day she'll go out once or twice and then right before we go to bed.

            seems to work.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by CKelly976 View Post
              So, if she thinks he needs to go out before bedtime, why can't she take the dog out?

              .
              this was my thought too. Seems simple enough.

              What time does he get his walks?
              Last edited by special; 10-23-2009, 07:44 AM.

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              • #8
                I also wonder what time you go to bed. If the dog pees at 9pm, but you're up til midnight or later, then yes I'd probably let it out again, especially if you're playing with it and it's been active. If you go to bed also at 9pm, then no, it's no big deal.

                Like people, activity can make things flow. So can long wake times. If I pee at 9, but have a drink later, then go to bed at midnight, I pee. If I go to bed early, I can go all night (most of the time!).

                Does she pee readily when taken out at 9, and then again later? If so, that may answer your question.
                Where fur and feather meet.....

                My Beloved Parrots

                My German Shepherd Dogs

                The Cat!

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                • #9
                  every dog is different, but bladders are generally bladders physiologically...and just because a dog can hold urine, doesn't mean he should have to....

                  take turns taking the dog out before bed and when you wake up.....those are the ones that make us groan and ask why we ever got dogs in the first place...but, it's a fact of life.....and one of the many things we do for the health of our dogs...down the line...holding it in for 11 hours at a time can have some health issues for your dog...

                  ask any nurse. they pride themselves on being able to hold it in for twelve hour shifts...then ask them how they're doing around retirement time.

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                  • #10
                    Ok so the consensus is...depends.
                    Just to clarify one point--the 9pm is a mile walk. He typically gets 3-4 of those daily. Sometimes the walk is much longer. So far these walks are his only pee opportunity and I do realize I need to take him out just briefly to pee--especially now that the weather is getting colder. The walk really should be a separate thing from the pee/poo opportunities.

                    This is a 2yo rescue dog we've owned for about 3 months. Can't be trusted off the leash yet and I need to work on that. The pee routine will get easier when I can let him off the line. I live out in the boonies where there are no fences for miles so I need to take this slow. In the first weeks after we got him home he got out a couple times & wouldn't return when called. Very stressful & I don't want to repeat that.

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                    • #11
                      How about getting a retractable lead? This way you can let him out to pee while you can stay in the doorway in the warmth
                      emily

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                      Disclaimer: Any similarities in my posts to anyone or anything real is purely coincidental.
                      Please do not take anything I type as fact. I also may not be who I say I am, so don't know anything about anything.

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                      • #12
                        i begin to see.....

                        i am guessing you both work, so rescue baby has to be confined for long periods of time?

                        do neither of you get home before nine for that walk, to drain off energy?

                        any chance someone can come home at lunch to walk the dog....

                        i do know that my honey gets up at four, due to a long commute..and i get up with him to help him get ready.....my commute is from the bedroom to the living room...i'm fortunate enough to telecommute to work....so i take the dogs around the block first thing and then make his lunch....and they go back to sleep for at least two to three hours.

                        i have my new one on a leash at all times, as he is not housetrained....or he's in his kennel when we sleep and when we're not home....

                        i am fortunate enough to be able to walk both dogs for a half mile at a time, a few times per day....he's a pug, don't want to tax him too much and she's almost ten, can't tax her too much...so it's periodic...

                        i have found that if you have a partner, then it's a two person job....and a schedule is necessary so that both of you share the load....

                        i can see why nine pm keeps you from sleeping especially after taking a mile long walk....

                        what time do you get up in the morning?
                        when do you and she get home from work?

                        one of the things we do is cook one day a week and make huge meals that can be frozen....we always have a choice of two to three entrees that are in the freezer. we also juice so saturdays and sundays are busy....thing is...with a new dog in the house, we weren't getting much time off anyway and it's a great way for us to spend time together, juicing and making salads and food and dog food.....kind of like a date LOL

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Magicre View Post
                          i begin to see.....
                          But not clearly...

                          I get up at 5am, home by 5pm. The wife works part time & sometimes is out til after 9pm. Dog rarely is home alone for long periods. We do share the duties but we don't see eye to eye on how late is OK to hang up the leash.

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                          • #14
                            When I had that problem with a dog not recall trained, I put an eyebolt beside my backdoor. I'd attach a long lead, and used this just for those 'have to go' times. Never for lounging about, it saved my feet when it snowed/rained. I can be a lazy trainer! I quit using it once he learned to stay nearby and recall.
                            Where fur and feather meet.....

                            My Beloved Parrots

                            My German Shepherd Dogs

                            The Cat!

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Macawpower58 View Post
                              When I had that problem with a dog not recall trained, I put an eyebolt beside my backdoor. I'd attach a long lead, and used this just for those 'have to go' times. Never for lounging about, it saved my feet when it snowed/rained. I can be a lazy trainer! I quit using it once he learned to stay nearby and recall.
                              That is very creative and useful!

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